5 Fish and Shellfish to Try During National Seafood Month

Adrien Sala Clams in Steel Bowl

Come October; there’s no better time to showcase seafood from Maine than National Seafood Month. Designated by Congress in 1990, National Seafood Month recognizes seafood’s nutritional and economic benefits. As one of our nation’s oldest industries, the US fisheries is a powerful economic driver. NOAA’s latest edition of Fisheries Economics of the United States places the value of commercial harvesting and retail operations of the US fishery industry at $255 billion in sales, with $117 billion in value-added impacts and a total of 1.2 million commercial jobs, and another 553,000 recreational jobs. 


A big part of that success happens right here in Maine. The commercial value of its fisheries reached an all-time high of $890,668,873 in 2021, an increase of $365 million from 2020 and surpassing the previous record of $733,691,455, set in 2016, by $150 million. 

A large part of that success is due to the Maine lobster, which, along with all the seafood from the Gulf of Maine, is considered some of the best tasting in the world. The unique marine environment of the Gulf, more a semi-enclosed sea than an actual gulf, is defined by clean, cold waters of the Labrador Current that flows into the Gulf from the north and constant exposure to sunlight, creating oxygen- and nutrient-rich waters that have made an ideal environment for a spectacular array of diverse marine life to thrive. There’s the world-famous Maine lobster, but a wide variety of shellfish—scallops, clams, oysters, crabs, mussels—and an abundance of some of the most sought-after finfish in the world, such as the Atlantic cod, haddock, hake, halibut, and the Atlantic salmon. 

This National Seafood Month, look no further than Klenda Seafood to order from a wide selection of the best locally sourced, sustainably harvested seafood available anywhere.

Five Maine Seafood Favorites for October:  

Lobster

No celebration of National Seafood Month would be complete without Maine lobster on the menu. More than the state’s premier seafood and one of its most iconic symbols, Maine lobster is regarded as the best-tasting lobster in the world. Known for its rich, delicate texture and sweet taste, the Gulf of Maine itself sets Maine lobster apart from other species worldwide—the perfect natural environment for lobsters to thrive. The frigid, icy water temperature slows the growth of lobster and prevents the salt water from permeating the meat. The combined effect produces the most tender, succulent meat of any species of lobster worldwide. Whether steamed, boiled, baked, or grilled, lobster is a healthy, delicious choice and holds a top spot on the menu.

Scallops

Add scallops to the menu for National Seafood Month. Scallops are not just a popular shellfish but one of the most prized and valuable seafood harvested in Maine. Sustainably managed and responsibly harvested, fresh Maine scallops are delicious for you. Their briny, creamy flavor makes it a seafood lover’s favorite. The thick, medallion-shaped adductor muscle—its edible meat—is located within the scallop shell and is regarded for its fresh, fragrant smell, slightly sweet and tender, buttery flavor, and texture. Varying in color from ivory and cream to slightly orange or gray, scallops can be prepared in various ways—pan seared, baked or grilled, tossed in breadcrumbs and fried, or added to a chowder.  

Clams

Maine clams are another dish on your menu for National Seafood Month. Found in abundance along the Maine coast, the tasty shellfish are harvested in the clam flats, the gravelly, muddy, and sandy intertidal region along the seashore—that area of the shore covered by the high tide and uncovered at low tide. Clams are flavorful, with a texture that is soft, chewy, and almost buttery. Versatile and well-regarded in the kitchen, clams can be prepared in numerous ways—they can be fried, baked, steamed, stuffed, sautéed, eaten raw on the half shell, for chowders, soups, and stews, or clam cakes and fritters—wherever a recipe takes you. More than tasty, clams are an exceptionally healthy, whole nutritional food. They are a lean protein source, high in Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, and iron, and rich in iodine and selenium. Other minerals, zinc, calcium, copper, manganese, and potassium, and vitamins C, B2, E, D, A, and folic acid, are among clam’s nutrient profiles. 

Haddock

Served in almost every restaurant, pub, diner, and roadside fish shack, haddock is the quintessential Maine seafood for any season. A lean white groundfish recognized by its medium flakes and mildly sweet in taste, once cooked, the moist texture remains dense yet tender and will fill your mouth with an exceptional meat-like flavor without a strong aftertaste. It can be prepared in several ways—baked, deep-fried, and broiled; stuffed, sauteed, or smoked—even poached—it makes excellent chowder and fish cakes. This tasty fish provides various nutritional benefits, too. It is lean in fat, high in protein, low in calories, and loaded with Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, minerals, and vitamins. 

Salmon

Native to Maine, Atlantic salmon is known for its mild flavor and healthy fat content, making it incredibly delicious and easy to cook—baked, broiled, grilled, stuffed, or fried. Atlantic salmon is an exceptionally nutritious food, too, and is high in omega-3 fatty acids, protein, minerals, vitamin B, and much more. Today, sustainable and organically farm-raised Atlantic salmon makes for a healthy, delicious entree any time of the year, but a choice dish for  National Seafood Month.

Don’t forget you can order FRESH live lobsters or fresh-picked meat online for delivery directly to your door, or feel free to contact us— we would be happy to answer any of your questions.